*//[[Yan Meng]], Wenrui Gong, [[Ryan Kastner]] and Timothy Sherwood//\n''Abstract:''\nWireless networks are making the vision of ubiquitous computing a reality: users will be able to connect anytime and anywhere from anything. To achieve this vision, the next generation of wireless devices must learn about, and adapt to, the transmission environment through a process called channel estimation. In this paper, we describe a cross-cutting approach to explore the design space to solve the channel estimation problem on reconfigurable devices. In particular we focus on the matching pursuit algorithm, which is a fast and accurate iterative algorithm for multi-path channel estimation. Our methodology models modern reconfigurable devices as an array of BRAM-level operation blocks ("BLOBs"), which act as flexible data paths. With the model, we describe design techniques and tradeoffs, resulting in novel optimizations at every level in building an energy efficient MP core, from the theory and algorithms to the bit level. We present results from our design space exploration over a number of different parameters, including both high level characteristics of the application, data and computation partitioning schemes, and module- and bit-level low-power techniques. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach to building a high speed and low power channel estimator. The total power saving is 25.4%. We further show that the local, distributed computation is, on average, 145% faster with minimum cost in power dissipation, than the global, centralized computation.\n[[Link|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/tech-alg_arch_energy_channel_est.pdf]]
Research on wireless sensor networks has broad societal impact. Enabling accurate positioning is important for applications in public safety (e.g. search and rescue), environmental monitoring and homeland security. Furthermore, the proposed research on multiuser channel estimation and detection will potentially increase the capacity of ad-hoc wireless networks, and thus provide society with greater access to information. \n\nAn overriding purpose of the project is the incorporation of embedded sensor networks into the education at UCSB. The research within this proposal will provide ample opportunity to support undergraduate and graduate research. In particular, the PIs believe strongly in undergraduate research. The PIs will continue to seek funding to provide research opportunities to undergraduate students through the continued use of on-campus undergraduate research internships and the NSF REU program. Furthermore, the research will be integrated into the the curriculum in the UCSB ECE department. More specifically, the curriculum of the Embedded System Design” class will be augmented to include sensor network topics.
*//Wenrui Gong, [[Yan Meng]], Gang Wang, [[Ryan Kastner]] and Timothy Sherwood//\n''Abstract:''\nContemporary reconfigurable architectures integrate distributed block RAM modules on-chip to provide ample storage for DSP, wireless, and image processing applications. Synthesizing applications to these complex systems requires an effective and efficient approach to conduct data partitioning and storage assignment. This work showed that different data partition schemes and storage assignment solutions, integrated with other memory optimization techniques, dramatically improve overall system performance. Experimental results indicated that partitioned designs could meet design goals and achieve much better performance.\n[[Link|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/ersa05-data_partitioning_bram.pdf]]
[[Overview]]
''Project Summary:''\n*+++[Intellectual Merit]>\nMobile sensor networks provide an opportunity to perform distributed sensing for a wide range of science and engineering applications. Accurate positioning plays an important role in many of these applications. This proposal describes an integrated research program for radiolocation/positioning with broader application to 3G/4G communications. The key problems addressed are:\n**Analysis and development of multiuser channel estimation algorithms, that can jointly estimate times of arrival (TOAs), and hence ranges of signals from multiple sensors.\n**Creation of a reconfigurable computational core, which enables an adaptive radiolocation platform. The core will be designed to allow tradeoffs between different system parameters, including power/energy, latency and accuracy of the positioning algorithms. Furthermore, this case study will give insight into automated synthesis techniques for implementing DSP applications on high performance reconfigurable systems.\n**Development of distributed estimation algorithms for sensor networks, that allow updating of position via transmission of (extended) Kalman filter estimates, rather than measurements themselves.\n**Implementation of cooperative radiolocation algorithms in a testbed operating in the 2.4 ~GHz ISM band.\n**Design of antenna arrays and sensing algorithms for the radiolocation network.\n The starting point for the proposed research is the further development of the Generalized Successive Interference Cancellation (GSIC) algorithm. GSIC can be used for radiolocation in a variety of different environments. Furthermore, it has much opportunity for exploiting parallelism, making it an ideal algorithm to implement on a reconfigurable platform. This proposal describes a new approach for long, sparse multipath channels and accurate identification of the direct path for ranging using a combined GSIC and Matching Pursuits (MP) algorithm.\n\n In order to properly update and fuse position estimates in the sensor network, an information graph approach will be adapted to the radiolocation problem. The information graph provides a systematic method for combining estimates while minimizing communications bandwidth. The final goal is the creation of a radiolocation testbed based on the MAXIM 2820 zero-IF transceiver, combined with Xilinx Virtex-II evaluation boards to form fully software-defined radios. The use of antenna arrays will also be considered for angle-of-arrival measurements and synthetic aperture array implementation.\n===\n\n*+++[Broader Impacts]>\nResearch on wireless sensor networks has broad societal impact. Enabling accurate positioning is important for applications in public safety (e.g. search and rescue), environmental monitoring and homeland security. Furthermore, the proposed research on multiuser channel estimation and detection will potentially increase the capacity of ad-hoc wireless networks, and thus provide society with greater access to information. \n\nAn overriding purpose of the project is the incorporation of embedded sensor networks into the education at UCSB. The research within this proposal will provide ample opportunity to support undergraduate and graduate research. In particular, the PIs believe strongly in undergraduate research. The PIs will continue to seek funding to provide research opportunities to undergraduate students through the continued use of on-campus undergraduate research internships and the NSF REU program. Furthermore, the research will be integrated into the the curriculum in the UCSB ECE department. More specifically, the curriculum of the Embedded System Design” class will be augmented to include sensor network topics.\n===\n\n[[Project Description|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/publications/project_description.pdf]]
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar +saveTiddler -cancelTiddler deleteTiddler'></div>\n<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>\n<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>\n<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>\n<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser'></span></div>
*//[[Andrew P. Brown]], [[Ronald A. Iltis]] and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n''Abstract:''\nEfficient distributed algorithms are an important enabling technology for large-scale ad-hoc wireless sensor and communications networks. In this paper, optimal Bayesian data fusion under the assumption of linear Gaussian state and measurement models is presented.Within this framework, an efficient algorithm for distributed state estimation in ad-hoc networks is developed. Approximate algorithms are then developed for further improvements in network resource efficiency. These include a parameterizable tradeoff of improved communications efficiency for increased latency in the rate at which information propagates through the network. It is also shown that the algorithms are well-suited for use with non-linear measurements. Finally, for distributed node position estimation in a mobile adhoc network, simulation results show that accurate, efficient node localization is achieved.\n[[Link|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/mass05-dist_alg_localization.pdf]]
*//[[Yan Meng]], Timothy Sherwood and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n''Abstract:''\nIf current technology scaling trends hold, leakage power dissipation will soon become the dominant source of power consumption. Caches, due to the fact that they account for the largest fraction of on-chip transistors in most modern processors, are a primary candidate for attacking the leakage problem. While there has been a flurry of research in this area over the Last several years, a major question remains unanswered. What is the total potential of existing architectural and circuit techniques to address this important design concern? In this paper, we explore the limits in which existing circuit and architecture technologies may address this growing problem. We first formally propose a parameterized model that can determine the optimal leakage savings based on the perfect knowledge of the address trace. By carefully applying the sleep and drowsy modes, we find that the total leakage power from the L1 instruction cache, data cache, and a unified L2 cache may be reduced to mere 3.6%, 0.9%, and 2.3%, respectively, of the unoptimized case. We further study how such a model can be extended to obtain the optimal leakage power savings for different cache configurations.\n[[Link|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/taco05-optimal_cache_leakage.pdf]]
*//Sunwoo Kim, [[Andrew P. Brown]], Timothy Pals, [[Ronald A. Iltis]] and [[Hua Lee]]//\n''Abstract:''\nChannel estimation and distributed positioning algorithms are presented for geolocation in a wireless ad hoc network. The network uses a direct-sequence code-division multiple-access-based handshaking protocol, in which nodes receive multiple acknowledgment packets in response to a request-to-send waveform. Round-trip travel time (RTT) and angle-of-arrival (AOA) measurements are obtained using the generalized successive interference cancellation/matching pursuits (GSIC/MP) algorithm. The performance of GSIC/MP is evaluated via simulation and comparison to the Cramér–Rao bound. Position estimates are initialized using linearized least-squares and updated by an extended Kalman filter-based algorithm that includes measurement validation for nonline-of-sight error mitigation. The method is generalized for distributed estimation in sparsely connected networks: at each node, position estimates from connected nodes are incorporated via a fusion algorithm and updated using locally processed RTT/AOA measurements. Finally, comprehensive ad hoc network simulations are presented including channel ray tracing, RTT/AOA estimation and validation, and distributed positioning.Channel estimation and distributed positioning algorithms are presented for geolocation in a wireless ad hoc network. Round-trip travel time (RTT) and angle-of-arrival (AOA) measurements are obtained using the generalized successive interference cancellation/matching pursuits (GSIC/MP) algorithm. The performance of GSIC/MP is evaluated via simulation and comparison to the Cramér–Rao bound.\n[[Link|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/publications/pub1.pdf]]
''Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara''\n\nCommunications, Control, and Signal Processing: imaging system analysis and optimization, acoustical and microwave imaging systems, signal and image processing, holographic and tomographic techniques, nondestructive evaluation, high-performance vision systems.\n\nProfessor Hua Lee received his Ph.D. degree from UC Santa Barbara in 1980. Prior to his return to UCSB in 1990, he was on the faculty of the University of Illinois at ~Urbana-Champaign. His research interests cover the areas of imaging system optimization, high-performance image formation algorithms, synthetic-aperture radar and sonar systems, acoustic microscopy, microwave nondestructive evaluation, and dynamic vision systems. His research laboratory was the first to produce the holographic and tomographic reconstructions from a scanning laser acoustic microscope, and his research team is also known as the leader in pulse-echo microwave nondestructive evaluation of civil structures and materials.\n\nProfessor Lee served as the Chairman of the 18th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging in 1989 and the 13th International Workshop on Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods in 1993. From 1988 to 1994, he served as Editor of the International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology. He also served as an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology from 1992 to 1995, and Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Image Processing from 1994 to 1996.\n\nProfessor Lee is a Fellow of IEEE and the Acoustical Society of America. In 1985, he received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation for his work in imaging system optimization. He was elected Professor of the Year in 1992 by the Mortar Board National Honor Society. Dr. Lee was also given the Nineteenth Pattern Recognition Society Award in 1993. \n\nClick [[here|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/Faculty/Lee/]] for his homepage
Mobile sensor networks provide an opportunity to perform distributed sensing for a wide range of science and engineering applications. Accurate positioning plays an important role in many of these applications. This proposal describes an integrated research program for radiolocation/positioning with broader application to 3G/4G communications. The key problems addressed are:\n**Analysis and development of multiuser channel estimation algorithms, that can jointly estimate times of arrival (TOAs), and hence ranges of signals from multiple sensors.\n**Creation of a reconfigurable computational core, which enables an adaptive radiolocation platform. The core will be designed to allow tradeoffs between different system parameters, including power/energy, latency and accuracy of the positioning algorithms. Furthermore, this case study will give insight into automated synthesis techniques for implementing DSP applications on high performance reconfigurable systems.\n**Development of distributed estimation algorithms for sensor networks, that allow updating of position via transmission of (extended) Kalman filter estimates, rather than measurements themselves.\n**Implementation of cooperative radiolocation algorithms in a testbed operating in the 2.4 ~GHz ISM band.\n**Design of antenna arrays and sensing algorithms for the radiolocation network.\n The starting point for the proposed research is the further development of the Generalized Successive Interference Cancellation (GSIC) algorithm. GSIC can be used for radiolocation in a variety of different environments. Furthermore, it has much opportunity for exploiting parallelism, making it an ideal algorithm to implement on a reconfigurable platform. This proposal describes a new approach for long, sparse multipath channels and accurate identification of the direct path for ranging using a combined GSIC and Matching Pursuits (MP) algorithm.\n\n In order to properly update and fuse position estimates in the sensor network, an information graph approach will be adapted to the radiolocation problem. The information graph provides a systematic method for combining estimates while minimizing communications bandwidth. The final goal is the creation of a radiolocation testbed based on the MAXIM 2820 zero-IF transceiver, combined with Xilinx Virtex-II evaluation boards to form fully software-defined radios. The use of antenna arrays will also be considered for angle-of-arrival measurements and synthetic aperture array implementation.
3rd year undegradate student. Majoring in Computer Engineer.
+++[UCSB]>\n* [[The University of California, Santa Barbara|http://www.ucsb.edu]]\n* [[Graduate Division|http://www.graddiv.ucsb.edu/]]\n* [[Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/]]\n* [[Department of Computer Science|http://www.cs.ucsb.edu]]\n===\n\n+++[Research]>\n* [[Sensing, Telemetry and Networking Laboratories|http://stnlabs.ece.ucsb.edu/index.html]]\n* [[Ad-Hoc Localization System (AHLoS) in NESL Lab at UCLA|http://nesl.ee.ucla.edu/projects/ahlos/]]\n* [[Scalable Location Aware Monitoring (SLAM) at MIT|http://nms.lcs.mit.edu/projects/slam/]]\n* [[PicoRadio at Berkeley Wireless Research Center|http://bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/Pico_Radio/Default.htm]]\n* [[MoteTrack at Harvard University|http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/%7Ekonrad/projects/motetrack/]]\n* [[Embedded Networks and Applications Laboratory at Yale University|http://www.eng.yale.edu/enalab/]]\n===\n\n+++[Digital Libraries]>\n* [[UCSB Library|http://www.library.ucsb.edu/]], [[online catalog (PEGASUS)|http://pegasus.library.ucsb.edu:82/ALEPH]], [[INSPEC@CDL|http://gateway.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&MODE=ovid&NEWS=N&PAGE=main&D=insz]]\n* [[IEEE Xplore|http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/Xplore/dynhome.jsp]]\n* [[ACM Digital Library|http://portal.acm.org/dl.cfm?coll=portal&dl=ACM&CFID=73680096&CFTOKEN=165847]]\n* [[Computer Science Bibliography|http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/%7Eley/db/index.html]]\n* [[Research Index (CiteSeer)|http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/cs]]\n===\n
*//[[Yan Meng]], [[Andrew P. Brown]], [[Ronald A. Iltis]], Timothy Sherwood, [[Hua Lee]] and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n''Abstract:''\nChannel estimation and multiuser detection is an enabling technology for future generations of wireless applications. However, sophisticated algorithms are required for accurate channel estimation and multiuser detection, making real-time implementation of these algorithms difficult. This paper presents architectural design methods for wireless channel estimation and multiuser detection. We redesign the matching pursuit (MP) algorithm used for channel estimation to reduce the complexity while maintaining the estimation accuracy. Furthermore, we develop a parameterized intellectual property (IP) core, which provides a hardware implementation of the MP algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the new algorithm and IP core for channel estimation. The implementation of our MP core on a modern, high performance reconfigurable system is about 216 times faster than running the algorithm using a state of the art microprocessor. The MP core possesses the speed required for performing true multiuser detection, enabling future generations of wireless communication applications. \n[[Link|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/publications/pub2.pdf]]
[[Overview]]\n[[Description]]\n[[People]]\n[[Publications]]\n[[Nugget]]\n[[Links]]\n[[System]]\n
/***\n''NestedSlidersPlugin for TiddlyWiki version 1.2.x and 2.0''\n^^author: Eric Shulman\nsource: http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#NestedSlidersPlugin\nlicense: [[Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License|http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/]]^^\n\nQuickly make any tiddler content into an expandable 'slider' panel, without needing to create a separate tiddler to contain the slider content. Optional syntax allows ''default to open'', ''custom button label/tooltip'' and ''automatic blockquote formatting.''\n\nYou can also 'nest' these sliders as deep as you like (see complex nesting example below), so that expandable 'tree-like' hierarchical displays can be created. This is most useful when converting existing in-line text content to create in-line annotations, footnotes, context-sensitive help, or other subordinate information displays.\n\nFor more details, please click on a section headline below:\n++++!!!!![Configuration]>\nDebugging messages for 'lazy sliders' deferred rendering:\n<<option chkDebugLazySliderDefer>> show debugging alert when deferring slider rendering\n<<option chkDebugLazySliderRender>> show debugging alert when deferred slider is actually rendered\n===\n++++!!!!![Usage]>\nWhen installed, this plugin adds new wiki syntax for embedding 'slider' panels directly into tiddler content. Use {{{+++}}} and {{{===}}} to delimit the slider content. Additional optional syntax elements let you specify\n*default to open\n*cookiename\n*heading level\n*floater\n*rollover\n*custom label/tooltip\n*automatic blockquote\n*deferred rendering\nThe complete syntax, using all options, is:\n//{{{\n++++(cookiename)!!!!!^*[label|tooltip]>...\ncontent goes here\n===\n//}}}\nwhere:\n* {{{+++}}} (or {{{++++}}}) and {{{===}}}^^\nmarks the start and end of the slider definition, respectively. When the extra {{{+}}} is used, the slider will be open when initially displayed.^^\n* {{{(cookiename)}}}^^\nsaves the slider opened/closed state, and restores this state whenever the slider is re-rendered.^^\n* {{{!}}} through {{{!!!!!}}}^^\ndisplays the slider label using a formatted headline (Hn) style instead of a button/link style^^\n* {{{"^"}}} //(without the quotes)//^^\nmakes the slider 'float' on top of other content rather than shifting that content downward^^\n* {{{"*"}}} //(without the quotes)//^^\nautomatically opens/closes slider on "rollover" as well as when clicked^^\n* {{{[label]}}} or {{{[label|tooltip]}}}^^\nuses custom label/tooltip. (defaults are: ">" (more) and "<" (less)^^\n* {{{">"}}} //(without the quotes)//^^\nautomatically adds blockquote formatting to slider content^^\n* {{{"..."}}} //(without the quotes)//^^\ndefers rendering of closed sliders until the first time they are opened. //Note: deferred rendering may produce unexpected results in some cases. Use with care.//^^\n\n//Note: to make slider definitions easier to read and recognize when editing a tiddler, newlines immediately following the {{{+++}}} 'start slider' or preceding the {{{===}}} 'end slider' sequence are automatically supressed so that excess whitespace is eliminated from the output.//\n===\n++++!!!!![Examples]>\nsimple in-line slider: \n{{{\n+++\n content\n===\n}}}\n+++\n content\n===\n----\nuse a custom label and tooltip: \n{{{\n+++[label|tooltip]\n content\n===\n}}}\n+++[label|tooltip]\n content\n===\n----\ncontent automatically blockquoted: \n{{{\n+++>\n content\n===\n}}}\n+++>\n content\n===\n----\nall options combined //(default open, cookie, heading, floater, rollover, label/tooltip, blockquoted, deferred)//\n{{{\n++++(testcookie)!!!^*[label|tooltip]>...\n content\n===\n}}}\n++++(testcookie)!!!^*[label|tooltip]>...\n content\n===\n----\ncomplex nesting example:\n{{{\n+++^[get info...|click for information]\n put some general information here, plus a floating slider with more specific info:\n +++^[view details...|click for details]\n put some detail here, which could include a rollover with a +++^*[glossary definition]explaining technical terms===\n ===\n===\n}}}\n+++^[get info...|click for information]\n put some general information here, plus a floating slider with more specific info:\n +++^[view details...|click for details]\n put some detail here, which could include a rollover with a +++^*[glossary definition]explaining technical terms===\n ===\n===\n----\nnested floaters\n>menu: <<tiddler NestedSlidersExample>>\n(see [[NestedSlidersExample]] for definition)\n----\n===\n+++!!!!![Installation]>\nimport (or copy/paste) the following tiddlers into your document:\n''NestedSlidersPlugin'' (tagged with <<tag systemConfig>>)\n===\n+++!!!!![Revision History]>\n\n++++[2006.02.16 - 1.7.7]\ncorrected deferred rendering to account for use-case where show/hide state is tracked in a cookie\n===\n\n++++[2006.02.15 - 1.7.6]\nin adjustSliderPos(), ensure that floating panel is positioned completely within the browser window (i.e., does not go beyond the right edge of the browser window)\n===\n\n++++[2006.02.04 - 1.7.5]\nadd 'var' to unintended global variable declarations to avoid FireFox 1.5.0.1 crash bug when assigning to globals\n===\n\n++++[2006.01.18 - 1.7.4]\nonly define adjustSliderPos() function if it has not already been provided by another plugin. This lets other plugins 'hijack' the function even when they are loaded first.\n===\n\n++++[2006.01.16 - 1.7.3]\nadded adjustSliderPos(place,btn,panel,panelClass) function to permit specialized logic for placement of floating panels. While it provides improved placement for many uses of floating panels, it exhibits a relative offset positioning error when used within *nested* floating panels. Short-term workaround is to only adjust the position for 'top-level' floaters.\n===\n\n++++[2006.01.16 - 1.7.2]\nadded button property to slider panel elements so that slider panel can tell which button it belongs to. Also, re-activated and corrected animation handling so that nested sliders aren't clipped by hijacking Slider.prototype.stop so that "overflow:hidden" can be reset to "overflow:visible" after animation ends\n===\n\n++++[2006.01.14 - 1.7.1]\nadded optional "^" syntax for floating panels. Defines new CSS class, ".floatingPanel", as an alternative for standard in-line ".sliderPanel" styles.\n===\n\n++++[2006.01.14 - 1.7.0]\nadded optional "*" syntax for rollover handling to show/hide slider without requiring a click (Based on a suggestion by tw4efl)\n===\n\n+++[2006.01.03 - 1.6.2]\nWhen using optional "!" heading style, instead of creating a clickable "Hn" element, create an "A" element inside the "Hn" element. (allows click-through in SlideShowPlugin, which captures nearly all click events, except for hyperlinks)\n===\n\n+++[2005.12.15 - 1.6.1]\nadded optional "..." syntax to invoke deferred ('lazy') rendering for initially hidden sliders\nremoved checkbox option for 'global' application of lazy sliders\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.25 - 1.6.0]\nadded optional handling for 'lazy sliders' (deferred rendering for initially hidden sliders)\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.21 - 1.5.1]\nrevised regular expressions: if present, a single newline //preceding// and/or //following// a slider definition will be suppressed so start/end syntax can be place on separate lines in the tiddler 'source' for improved readability. Similarly, any whitespace (newlines, tabs, spaces, etc.) trailing the 'start slider' syntax or preceding the 'end slider' syntax is also suppressed.\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.20 - 1.5.0]\n added (cookiename) syntax for optional tracking and restoring of slider open/close state\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.11 - 1.4.0]\n added !!!!! syntax to render slider label as a header (Hn) style instead of a button/link style\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.07 - 1.3.0]\n removed alternative syntax {{{(((}}} and {{{)))}}} (so they can be used by other\n formatting extensions) and simplified/improved regular expressions to trim multiple excess newlines\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.05 - 1.2.1]\n changed name to NestedSlidersPlugin\n more documentation\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.04 - 1.2.0]\n added alternative character-mode syntax {{{(((}}} and {{{)))}}}\n tweaked "eat newlines" logic for line-mode {{{+++}}} and {{{===}}} syntax\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.03 - 1.1.1]\n fixed toggling of default tooltips ("more..." and "less...") when a non-default button label is used\n code cleanup, added documentation\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.03 - 1.1.0]\n changed delimiter syntax from {{{(((}}} and {{{)))}}} to {{{+++}}} and {{{===}}}\n changed name to EasySlidersPlugin\n===\n\n+++[2005.11.03 - 1.0.0]\n initial public release\n===\n\n===\n+++!!!!![Credits]>\nThis feature was implemented by EricShulman from [[ELS Design Studios|http:/www.elsdesign.com]] with research, programming and suggestions from RodneyGomes, GeoffSlocock, and PaulPetterson\n===\n***/\n// //+++!!!!![Code]\n//{{{\nversion.extensions.nestedSliders = {major: 1, minor: 7, revision: 7, date: new Date(2006,2,16)};\n//}}}\n\n//{{{\n// options for deferred rendering of sliders that are not initially displayed\nif (config.options.chkDebugLazySliderDefer==undefined) config.options.chkDebugLazySliderDefer=false;\nif (config.options.chkDebugLazySliderRender==undefined) config.options.chkDebugLazySliderRender=false;\n\n// default styles for 'floating' class\nsetStylesheet(".floatingPanel { position:absolute; 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__''Project Description and Outcome'' __\n//Tools://\nChannel estimation and multiuser detection is an enabling technology for future generations of wireless applications. However, sophisticated algorithms are required for accurate channel estimation and multiuser detection, making real-time implementation of these algorithms difficult. We have studied a novel cross-cutting design approach to optimize our design at every level, from the theory and algorithms to the arithmetic and physical placement. The matching pursuit (MP) algorithm is streamlined based on a sufficient statistics interpretation to reduce the complexity while maintaining the estimation accuracy and a parameterized intellectual property (IP) core has been developed to provide an efficient hardware implementation of the MP algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the new algorithm and IP core for channel estimation. The implementation of our MP core on a modern, high performance reconfigurable system is about 216 times faster than running the algorithm one a state of the art microprocessor. This MP core possesses the speed required for performing true multiuser detection, enabling future generations of wireless communication applications.\n\n|[img[Matching Pursuits Algorithm for Radiolocation|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/images/pic1.JPG]]|Wireless communication channels typically contain multiple paths due to scattering environments, and thus the received signal is composed of many delayed and attenuated versions of the transmitted signal. Given accurate estimates of the channel parameters, signal corruption due to the interference of the multipath propagation can be easily reversed and the signals from the multiple paths can be combined coherently to obtain accurate round trip travel time estimation (for positioning), increased noise immunity, and overall improvement in data rates. Our sufficient statistics based MP algorithm is parallelized and mapped onto a modern reconfigurable to achieve fast channel estimation in different scattering environments.|\n\nOur MP design was featured in the 2005 Design Automation Conference as part of Wireless Wednesday – a special day on wireless design issues and challenges ([[http://rfdesign.com/news/DAC-2005-designers/|http://rfdesign.com/news/DAC-2005-designers/]]).\n\n//Ideas://\nNetwork-based distributed localization and data fusion algorithms, which provide valuable savings in network resources, are required for deployment of ad-hoc sensor and communications networks with large numbers of nodes. The applications of such networks are nearly limitless: low-cost wireless sensors can autonomously monitor phenomena of scientific, commercial, or military interest. By distributing localization and/or data fusion operations throughout the nodes of the network, deployment of huge networks with long life spans is enabled. In the distributed paradigm, sensor nodes estimate their own positions—and the positions of surrounding nodes—using measured inter-node ranges obtained from round-trip travel times in communication. The position estimation algorithms are fully distributed, and rely on a powerful data fusion approach in which each node processes local measurements to update its own local view, aggregates new information into a compressed form, and transmits information packets to nearby nodes, where the information is fused. Key contributions of our work include algorithms which maximize communication efficiency and which allow for fusion of information in the presence of finite processing and communication delays encountered in real, deployed networks. Furthermore, this research can have a broad impact, since the algorithms are applicable for a wide range of sensor types and applications, as demonstrated by our ongoing work in the context of indoor, dense urban, and underwater environments.\n\n|[img[Matching Pursuits Algorithm for Radiolocation|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/images/pic2.JPG]]|The use of distributed localization and data fusion algorithms in mobile ad-hoc sensor networks can provide significant improvements in communication efficiency, enabling long-term operation of huge networks. In the distributed paradigm, nodes process information locally, aggregating it in a compact representation, and communicating—as needed—with other nodes. By distributing the required computation throughout the network, individual nodes are not overburdened. These benefits are achieved while maintaining accurate estimation of dynamic processes, under realistic computation and communication latency constraints.|
Advances in radios, sensors, actuators and embedded computing technology have enabled a proliferation of wireless sensing networks. These networks offer an affordable way of performing distributed sensing for a seemingly unbounded set of applications. Accurate positioning is a key enabler for many sensor applications including surveillance networks, robotic sensors, location-based routing in wireless ad-hoc sensor networks, smart spaces and environmental monitoring by mobile sensors. Although GPS can potentially provide accurate positioning, the complexity of the required receivers may be too costly for inexpensive sensor nodes. Furthermore, the GPS signal is extremely weak and positioning can be unreliable inside buildings or under dense foliage. These drawbacks to GPS positioning have led to increasing interest in ~GPS-less distributed radiolocation methods for wireless sensor networks. This project focuses on the use of ~ISM-band radios (e.g. 802.11b) for ~GPS-less cooperative radiolocation using time-of-arrival.\n\nThere are numerous problems that must be solved for adaptive radiolocation in sensor networks. Multiaccess interference occurs if multiple sensors transmit acknowledgements at the same time. The presence of multipath can obscure and interfere with correct estimation of the time-of-arrival causing range errors. The RF power amplifier is a major energy consumer; therefore positioning estimates must be made with minimal communication.\n\nThe project addresses these problems through:\n** Analysis and development of multiuser channel estimation algorithms that can jointly estimate times of arrival (TOAs) from multiple sensors.\n** Creation of a reconfigurable computational core, which enables an adaptive radiolocation platform. The core will be designed to allow tradeoffs between different system parameters, including power/energy, latency and accuracy of the positioning algorithms.\n** Development of distributed estimation algorithms for sensor networks.\n** Implementation of cooperative radiolocation algorithms in a testbed operating in the 2.4 ~GHz ISM band.\n** Design of antenna arrays and sensing algorithms for the radiolocation network.\n
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3rd year undegradate student. Majoring in Electrical Engineer.
*Principle Investigators\n**[[Ronald A. Iltis]]\n**[[Ryan Kastner]]\n**[[Hua Lee]]\n*Graduate Students\n**[[Andrew P. Brown]]\n**[[Yan Meng]]\n*Undergradute Students\n**[[Brian DeRenzi]]\n**[[Patrick Lai]]\n**[[Isaac Liu]]
*[[Geolocation in Ad Hoc Networks Using DS-CDMA and Generalized Successive Interference Cancellation|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/publications/pub1.pdf]]\n***//Sunwoo Kim, [[Andrew P. Brown]], Timothy Pals, [[Ronald A. Iltis]] and [[Hua Lee]]//\n***IEEE journal on selected areas in communications, Vol. 23, No. 5, May 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nChannel estimation and distributed positioning algorithms are presented for geolocation in a wireless ad hoc network. The network uses a direct-sequence code-division multiple-access-based handshaking protocol, in which nodes receive multiple acknowledgment packets in response to a request-to-send waveform. Round-trip travel time (RTT) and angle-of-arrival (AOA) measurements are obtained using the generalized successive interference cancellation/matching pursuits (GSIC/MP) algorithm. The performance of GSIC/MP is evaluated via simulation and comparison to the Cramér–Rao bound. Position estimates are initialized using linearized least-squares and updated by an extended Kalman filter-based algorithm that includes measurement validation for nonline-of-sight error mitigation. The method is generalized for distributed estimation in sparsely connected networks: at each node, position estimates from connected nodes are incorporated via a fusion algorithm and updated using locally processed RTT/AOA measurements. Finally, comprehensive ad hoc network simulations are presented including channel ray tracing, RTT/AOA estimation and validation, and distributed positioning.Channel estimation and distributed positioning algorithms are presented for geolocation in a wireless ad hoc network. Round-trip travel time (RTT) and angle-of-arrival (AOA) measurements are obtained using the generalized successive interference cancellation/matching pursuits (GSIC/MP) algorithm. The performance of GSIC/MP is evaluated via simulation and comparison to the Cramér–Rao bound.\n===\n\n----\n*[[M.P. Core: Algorithm and Design Techniques for Efficient Channel Estimation in Wireless Applications|http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation/publications/pub2.pdf]]\n***//[[Yan Meng]], [[Andrew P. Brown]], [[Ronald A. Iltis]], Timothy Sherwood, [[Hua Lee]] and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n***Design Automation Conference (DAC), June 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nChannel estimation and multiuser detection is an enabling technology for future generations of wireless applications. However, sophisticated algorithms are required for accurate channel estimation and multiuser detection, making real-time implementation of these algorithms difficult. This paper presents architectural design methods for wireless channel estimation and multiuser detection. We redesign the matching pursuit (MP) algorithm used for channel estimation to reduce the complexity while maintaining the estimation accuracy. Furthermore, we develop a parameterized intellectual property (IP) core, which provides a hardware implementation of the MP algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the new algorithm and IP core for channel estimation. The implementation of our MP core on a modern, high performance reconfigurable system is about 216 times faster than running the algorithm using a state of the art microprocessor. The MP core possesses the speed required for performing true multiuser detection, enabling future generations of wireless communication applications.\n===\n\n----\n*[[Exploring the Limits of Leakage Power Reduction in Caches|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/taco05-optimal_cache_leakage.pdf]]\n***//[[Yan Meng]], Timothy Sherwood and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n***ACM Transactions on Architecture and Code Optimization, November 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nIf current technology scaling trends hold, leakage power dissipation will soon become the dominant source of power consumption. Caches, due to the fact that they account for the largest fraction of on-chip transistors in most modern processors, are a primary candidate for attacking the leakage problem. While there has been a flurry of research in this area over the Last several years, a major question remains unanswered. What is the total potential of existing architectural and circuit techniques to address this important design concern? In this paper, we explore the limits in which existing circuit and architecture technologies may address this growing problem. We first formally propose a parameterized model that can determine the optimal leakage savings based on the perfect knowledge of the address trace. By carefully applying the sleep and drowsy modes, we find that the total leakage power from the L1 instruction cache, data cache, and a unified L2 cache may be reduced to mere 3.6%, 0.9%, and 2.3%, respectively, of the unoptimized case. We further study how such a model can be extended to obtain the optimal leakage power savings for different cache configurations.\n===\n\n----\n*[[Algorithm/Architecture Co-exploration for Designing Energy Efficient Channel Estimator|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/tech-alg_arch_energy_channel_est.pdf]]\n***//[[Yan Meng]], Wenrui Gong, [[Ryan Kastner]] and Timothy Sherwood//\n***American Scientific Publishers Journal of Low Power Electronics, December 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nWireless networks are making the vision of ubiquitous computing a reality: users will be able to connect anytime and anywhere from anything. To achieve this vision, the next generation of wireless devices must learn about, and adapt to, the transmission environment through a process called channel estimation. In this paper, we describe a cross-cutting approach to explore the design space to solve the channel estimation problem on reconfigurable devices. In particular we focus on the matching pursuit algorithm, which is a fast and accurate iterative algorithm for multi-path channel estimation. Our methodology models modern reconfigurable devices as an array of BRAM-level operation blocks ("BLOBs"), which act as flexible data paths. With the model, we describe design techniques and tradeoffs, resulting in novel optimizations at every level in building an energy efficient MP core, from the theory and algorithms to the bit level. We present results from our design space exploration over a number of different parameters, including both high level characteristics of the application, data and computation partitioning schemes, and module- and bit-level low-power techniques. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach to building a high speed and low power channel estimator. The total power saving is 25.4%. We further show that the local, distributed computation is, on average, 145% faster with minimum cost in power dissipation, than the global, centralized computation.\n===\n\n----\n*[[Data Partitioning for Reconfigurable Architectures with Distributed Block RAM|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/mass05-dist_alg_localization.pdf]]\n***//Wenrui Gong, [[Yan Meng]], Gang Wang, [[Ryan Kastner]] and Timothy Sherwood//\n***International Conference on Engineering of Reconfigurable Systems and Algorithms (ERSA), June 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nEfficient distributed algorithms are an important enabling technology for large-scale ad-hoc wireless sensor and communications networks. In this paper, optimal Bayesian data fusion under the assumption of linear Gaussian state and measurement models is presented.Within this framework, an efficient algorithm for distributed state estimation in ad-hoc networks is developed. Approximate algorithms are then developed for further improvements in network resource efficiency. These include a parameterizable tradeoff of improved communications efficiency for increased latency in the rate at which information propagates through the network. It is also shown that the algorithms are well-suited for use with non-linear measurements. Finally, for distributed node position estimation in a mobile adhoc network, simulation results show that accurate, efficient node localization is achieved.\n===\n\n----\n*[[Efficient Distributed Algorithms for Data Fusion and Node Localization in Mobile Ad-hoc Networks|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/%7Ekastner/papers/ersa05-data_partitioning_bram.pdf]]\n***//[[Andrew P. Brown]], [[Ronald A. Iltis]] and [[Ryan Kastner]]//\n***International Conference on Mobile Ad-hoc and Sensor Systems (MASS), November 2005\n***+++[Abstract]>\nContemporary reconfigurable architectures integrate distributed block RAM modules on-chip to provide ample storage for DSP, wireless, and image processing applications. Synthesizing applications to these complex systems requires an effective and efficient approach to conduct data partitioning and storage assignment. This work showed that different data partition schemes and storage assignment solutions, integrated with other memory optimization techniques, dramatically improve overall system performance. Experimental results indicated that partitioned designs could meet design goals and achieve much better performance.\n===\n
''Ph.D., University of California, San Diego''\n\nCommunications, Control, and Signal Processing: digital spread-spectrum communication, distributed estimation, multi-target tracking, neural networks.\n\nJoining the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department in 1984, Professor Iltis' research interests lie in the areas of spread-spectrum communications and distributed estimation theory, which fall into the general category of statistical signal processing. In the area of digital communications, Iltis' focus is adaptive spread-spectrum receiver designs (high-frequency channels and mobile communications) and solving their inherent problems—interference rejection, multiuser detection, and synchronization.\n\nHis current work involves developing new multiuser detection algorithms for quasi-synchronous communication networks, as well as new nonlinear estimation algorithms using reduced sufficient statistics. He received the Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Faculty Award in ECE in 1990, and the Fred W. Ellersick Award for Best Paper at the 1990 IEEE Military Communications Conference. He was the Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications from 1986 to 1990. \n\nclick [[here|http://www.ece.ucsb.edu/Faculty/Iltis/]] for his homepage
''Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles''\n\nRyan is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received a ~PhD in Computer Science at UCLA, a masters degree (MS) in engineering and bachelor degrees (BS) in both Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, all from Northwestern University. He was born in Greensburg, PA and spent his entire life moving westward - first to Medina, OH, then to Chicago, Los Angeles and currently Santa Barbara. His current research interests lie in the realm of embedded systems, in particular reconfigurable computing, digital signal processing, wireless communication and underwater sensor networks.\n\nClick [[here|http:///www.ece.ucsb.edu/~kastner]] for his home page
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Adaptive Radiolocation for Mobile Sensor Networks
http://express.ece.ucsb.edu/radiolocation
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/***\n!Colors Used\n*@@bgcolor(#8cf): #8cf - Background blue@@\n*@@bgcolor(#18f): #18f - Top blue@@\n*@@bgcolor(#04b): #04b - Mid blue@@\n*@@bgcolor(#014):color(#fff): #014 - Bottom blue@@\n*@@bgcolor(#ffc): #ffc - Bright yellow@@\n*@@bgcolor(#fe8): #fe8 - Highlight yellow@@\n*@@bgcolor(#db4): #db4 - Background yellow@@\n*@@bgcolor(#841): #841 - Border yellow@@\n*@@bgcolor(#703):color(#fff): #703 - Title red@@\n*@@bgcolor(#866): #866 - Subtitle grey@@\n!Generic Rules /%==============================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\nbody {\n background: #fff;\n color: #000;\n}\n\na{\n color: #04b;\n}\n\na:hover{\n background: #04b;\n color: #fff;\n}\n\na img{\n border: 0;\n}\n\nh1,h2,h3,h4,h5 {\n color: #703;\n background: #8cf;\n}\n\n.button {\n color: #014;\n border: 1px solid #fff;\n}\n\n.button:hover {\n color: #014;\n background: #fe8;\n border-color: #db4;\n}\n\n.button:active {\n color: #fff;\n background: #db4;\n border: 1px solid #841;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Header /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.header {\n background-image:\n url('banner.JPG');\n background-repeat: \nno-repeat; \n}\n\n.headerShadow {\n color: #000;\n}\n\n.headerShadow a {\n font-weight: normal;\n color: #000;\n}\n\n.headerForeground {\n color: #fff;\n}\n\n.headerForeground a {\n font-weight: normal;\n color: #8cf;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!General tabs /%=================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n\n.tabSelected{\n color: #014;\n background: #eee;\n border-left: 1px solid #ccc;\n border-top: 1px solid #ccc;\n border-right: 1px solid #ccc;\n}\n\n.tabUnselected {\n color: #fff;\n background: #999;\n}\n\n.tabContents {\n color: #014;\n background: #eee;\n border: 1px solid #ccc;\n}\n\n.tabContents .button {\n border: 0;}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Sidebar options /%=================================================%/\n~TiddlyLinks and buttons are treated identically in the sidebar and slider panel\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#sidebar {\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions input {\n border: 1px solid #04b;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {\n background: #8cf;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {\n border: none;\n color: #04b;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:hover {\n color: #fff;\n background: #04b;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:active {\n color: #04b;\n background: #fff;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Message Area /%=================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#messageArea {\n border: 1px solid #841;\n background: #db4;\n color: #014;\n}\n\n#messageArea .button {\n padding: 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em 0.2em;\n color: #014;\n background: #fff;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Popup /%=================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.popup {\n background: #18f;\n border: 1px solid #04b;\n}\n\n.popup hr {\n color: #014;\n background: #014;\n border-bottom: 1px;\n}\n\n.popup li.disabled {\n color: #04b;\n}\n\n.popup li a, .popup li a:visited {\n color: #eee;\n border: none;\n}\n\n.popup li a:hover {\n background: #014;\n color: #fff;\n border: none;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Tiddler Display /%=================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.tiddler .defaultCommand {\n font-weight: bold;\n}\n\n.shadow .title {\n color: #866;\n}\n\n.title {\n color: #703;\n}\n\n.subtitle {\n color: #866;\n}\n\n.toolbar {\n color: #04b;\n}\n\n.tagging, .tagged {\n border: 1px solid #eee;\n background-color: #eee;\n}\n\n.selected .tagging, .selected .tagged {\n background-color: #ddd;\n border: 1px solid #bbb;\n}\n\n.tagging .listTitle, .tagged .listTitle {\n color: #014;\n}\n\n.tagging .button, .tagged .button {\n border: none;\n}\n\n.footer {\n color: #ddd;\n}\n\n.selected .footer {\n color: #888;\n}\n\n.sparkline {\n background: #8cf;\n border: 0;\n}\n\n.sparktick {\n background: #014;\n}\n\n.errorButton {\n color: #ff0;\n background: #f00;\n}\n\n.cascade {\n background: #eef;\n color: #aac;\n border: 1px solid #aac;\n}\n\n.imageLink, #displayArea .imageLink {\n background: transparent;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''The viewer is where the tiddler content is displayed'' /%------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n\n.viewer .listTitle {list-style-type: none; margin-left: -2em;}\n\n.viewer .button {\n border: 1px solid #db4;\n}\n\n.viewer blockquote {\n border-left: 3px solid #666;\n}\n\n.viewer table {\n border: 2px solid #333;\n}\n\n.viewer th, thead td {\n background: #db4;\n border: 1px solid #666;\n color: #fff;\n}\n\n.viewer td, .viewer tr {\n border: 1px solid #666;\n}\n\n.viewer pre {\n border: 1px solid #fe8;\n background: #ffc;\n}\n\n.viewer code {\n color: #703;\n}\n\n.viewer hr {\n border: 0;\n border-top: dashed 1px #666;\n color: #666;\n}\n\n.highlight, .marked {\n background: #fe8;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''The editor replaces the viewer in the tiddler'' /%------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.editor input {\n border: 1px solid #04b;\n}\n\n.editor textarea {\n border: 1px solid #04b;\n width: 100%;\n}\n\n.editorFooter {\n color: #aaa;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/
/***\n!Sections in this Tiddler:\n*Generic rules\n**Links styles\n**Link Exceptions\n*Header\n*Main menu\n*Sidebar\n**Sidebar options\n**Sidebar tabs\n*Message area\n*Popup\n*Tabs\n*Tiddler display\n**Viewer\n**Editor\n*Misc. rules\n!Generic Rules /%==============================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\nbody {\n font-size: .75em;\n font-family: arial,helvetica;\n position: relative;\n margin: 0;\n padding: 0;\n}\n\nh1,h2,h3,h4,h5 {\n font-weight: bold;\n text-decoration: none;\n padding-left: 0.4em;\n}\n\nh1 {font-size: 1.35em;}\nh2 {font-size: 1.25em;}\nh3 {font-size: 1.1em;}\nh4 {font-size: 1em;}\nh5 {font-size: .9em;}\n\nhr {\n height: 1px;\n}\n\na{\n text-decoration: none;\n}\n\nol { list-style-type: decimal }\nol ol { list-style-type: lower-alpha }\nol ol ol { list-style-type: lower-roman }\nol ol ol ol { list-style-type: decimal }\nol ol ol ol ol { list-style-type: lower-alpha }\nol ol ol ol ol ol { list-style-type: lower-roman }\nol ol ol ol ol ol ol { list-style-type: decimal }\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''General Link Styles'' /%-----------------------------------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.externalLink {\n text-decoration: underline;\n}\n\n.tiddlyLinkExisting {\n font-weight: bold;\n}\n\n.tiddlyLinkNonExisting {\n font-style: italic;\n}\n\n/* the 'a' is required for IE, otherwise it renders the whole tiddler a bold */\na.tiddlyLinkNonExisting.shadow {\n font-weight: bold;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''Exceptions to common link styles'' /%------------------------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n\n#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkExisting, \n#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkNonExisting,\n#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkExisting,\n#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkNonExisting{\n font-weight: normal;\n font-style: normal;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Header /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n\n.header {\n position: relative;\n}\n\n.header a:hover {\n background: transparent;\n}\n\n.headerShadow {\n position: relative;\n padding: 4.5em 0em 1em 1em;\n left: -1px;\n top: -1px;\n}\n\n.headerForeground {\n position: absolute;\n padding: 4.5em 0em 1em 1em;\n left: 0px;\n top: 0px;\n}\n\n.siteTitle {\n font-size: 3em;\n}\n\n.siteSubtitle {\n font-size: 1.2em;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Main menu /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#mainMenu {\n position: absolute;\n left: 0;\n width: 10em;\n text-align: right;\n line-height: 1.6em;\n padding: 1.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em;\n font-size: 1.1em;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Sidebar rules /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#sidebar {\n position: absolute;\n right: 3px;\n width: 16em;\n font-size: .9em;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''Sidebar options'' /%----------------------------------------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#sidebarOptions {\n padding-top: 0.3em;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions a {\n margin: 0em 0.2em;\n padding: 0.2em 0.3em;\n display: block;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions input {\n margin: 0.4em 0.5em;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {\n margin-left: 1em;\n padding: 0.5em;\n font-size: .85em;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {\n font-weight: bold;\n display: inline;\n padding: 0;\n}\n\n#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel input {\n margin: 0 0 .3em 0;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''Sidebar tabs'' /%-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n\n#sidebarTabs .tabContents {\n width: 15em;\n overflow: hidden;\n}\n\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Message area /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#messageArea {\nposition:absolute; top:0; right:0; margin: 0.5em; padding: 0.5em;\n}\n\n*[id='messageArea'] {\nposition:fixed !important; z-index:99;}\n\n.messageToolbar {\ndisplay: block;\ntext-align: right;\n}\n\n#messageArea a{\n text-decoration: underline;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Popup /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.popup {\n font-size: .9em;\n padding: 0.2em;\n list-style: none;\n margin: 0;\n}\n\n.popup hr {\n display: block;\n height: 1px;\n width: auto;\n padding: 0;\n margin: 0.2em 0em;\n}\n\n.popup li.disabled {\n padding: 0.2em;\n}\n\n.popup li a{\n display: block;\n padding: 0.2em;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Tabs /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.tabset {\n padding: 1em 0em 0em 0.5em;\n}\n\n.tab {\n margin: 0em 0em 0em 0.25em;\n padding: 2px;\n}\n\n.tabContents {\n padding: 0.5em;\n}\n\n.tabContents ul, .tabContents ol {\n margin: 0;\n padding: 0;\n}\n\n.txtMainTab .tabContents li {\n list-style: none;\n}\n\n.tabContents li.listLink {\n margin-left: .75em;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Tiddler display rules /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n#displayArea {\n margin: 1em 17em 0em 14em;\n}\n\n\n.toolbar {\n text-align: right;\n font-size: .9em;\n visibility: hidden;\n}\n\n.selected .toolbar {\n visibility: visible;\n}\n\n.tiddler {\n padding: 1em 1em 0em 1em;\n}\n\n.missing .viewer,.missing .title {\n font-style: italic;\n}\n\n.title {\n font-size: 1.6em;\n font-weight: bold;\n}\n\n.missing .subtitle {\n display: none;\n}\n\n.subtitle {\n font-size: 1.1em;\n}\n\n/* I'm not a fan of how button looks in tiddlers... */\n.tiddler .button {\n padding: 0.2em 0.4em;\n}\n\n.tagging {\nmargin: 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0;\nfloat: left;\ndisplay: none;\n}\n\n.isTag .tagging {\ndisplay: block;\n}\n\n.tagged {\nmargin: 0.5em;\nfloat: right;\n}\n\n.tagging, .tagged {\nfont-size: 0.9em;\npadding: 0.25em;\n}\n\n.tagging ul, .tagged ul {\nlist-style: none;margin: 0.25em;\npadding: 0;\n}\n\n.tagClear {\nclear: both;\n}\n\n.footer {\n font-size: .9em;\n}\n\n.footer li {\ndisplay: inline;\n}\n/***\n''The viewer is where the tiddler content is displayed'' /%------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n* html .viewer pre {\n width: 99%;\n padding: 0 0 1em 0;\n}\n\n.viewer {\n line-height: 1.4em;\n padding-top: 0.5em;\n}\n\n.viewer .button {\n margin: 0em 0.25em;\n padding: 0em 0.25em;\n}\n\n.viewer blockquote {\n line-height: 1.5em;\n padding-left: 0.8em;\n margin-left: 2.5em;\n}\n\n.viewer ul, .viewer ol{\n margin-left: 0.5em;\n padding-left: 1.5em;\n}\n\n.viewer table {\n border-collapse: collapse;\n margin: 0.8em 1.0em;\n}\n\n.viewer th, .viewer td, .viewer tr,.viewer caption{\n padding: 3px;\n}\n\n.viewer pre {\n padding: 0.5em;\n margin-left: 0.5em;\n font-size: 1.2em;\n line-height: 1.4em;\n overflow: auto;\n}\n\n.viewer code {\n font-size: 1.2em;\n line-height: 1.4em;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n''The editor replaces the viewer in the tiddler'' /%------------------------------------------------%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.editor {\nfont-size: 1.1em;\n}\n\n.editor input, .editor textarea {\n display: block;\n width: 100%;\n font: inherit;\n}\n\n.editorFooter {\n padding: 0.25em 0em;\n font-size: .9em;\n}\n\n.editorFooter .button {\npadding-top: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px;}\n\n.fieldsetFix {border: 0;\npadding: 0;\nmargin: 1px 0px 1px 0px;\n}\n/*}}}*/\n/***\n!Misc rules /%==================================================%/\n***/\n/*{{{*/\n.sparkline {\n line-height: 1em;\n}\n\n.sparktick {\n outline: 0;\n}\n\n.zoomer {\n font-size: 1.1em;\n position: absolute;\n padding: 1em;\n}\n\n.cascade {\n font-size: 1.1em;\n position: absolute;\n overflow: hidden;\n}\n/*}}}*/
\n [[AdvancedOptions]]\n [[DefaultTiddlers]]\n [[EditTemplate]]\n [[GettingStarted]]\n [[MainMenu]]\n [[MarkupPostBody]]\n [[MarkupPostHead]]\n [[MarkupPreBody]]\n [[MarkupPreHead]]\n [[OptionsPanel]]\n [[PageTemplate]]\n [[SideBarOptions]]\n [[SideBarTabs]]\n [[SiteSubtitle]]\n [[SiteTitle]]\n [[SiteUrl]]\n [[StyleSheet]]\n [[StyleSheetColors]]\n [[StyleSheetLayout]]\n [[StyleSheetPrint]]\n [[TabAll]]\n [[TabMore]]\n [[TabMoreMissing]]\n [[TabMoreOrphans]]\n [[TabMoreShadowed]]\n [[TabTags]]\n [[TabTimeline]]\n [[ViewTemplate]]
Times of arrival
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar -closeTiddler closeOthers +editTiddler permalink references jump'></div>\n<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>\n<div class='subtitle'> <span macro='view modified date [[MMM DD YYYY]]'></span> </div>\n<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>\n<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>\n<div class='tagClear'></div>
Copied from Yan's website:\n\nI am a Ph.D. student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of California, Santa Barbara. My advisors are Prof. Ryan Kastner and Prof. Timothy Sherwood. I am with both the ExPRESS group and the ArchLab. My current research interests are focused on reconfigurable computing, low power design, system synthesis, combinatorial optimizations, and computer architectures.\n\n